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Outsmarting Alzheimer's
What You Can Do to Reduce Your Risk

By Kenneth S. Kosik

Subject: Health
hardcover | 320 pages | 6 1/4 x 9 1/4
US$24.99 | CAN$27.99
Publication Date: 2015-12-29
ISBN: 9781621452447
EBOOK: 9781621452447

VIEW THE BRAIN SMART GAMES - These challenging, but fun, excerises help to strengthen your spatial and problem-sloving skills.

Did you know that eating grilled meat could increase your risk of being struck down by dementia? That a simple cold sore could be associated with your failing memory? Or that getting on the treadmill can help keep your brain sharp?

The dozens of choices you make over the course of any average day — ordering the curry vs. the samosas, relaxing in front of the TV vs. socializing with friends, reading the newspaper vs. watching the news — really can both determine whether you'll develop dementia years from now as well as how quickly the disease will progress. The US government pours an annual $480 million into Alzheimer's research, but effective medical treatments remain elusive. The good news is that you have the power to outsmart this terrifying disease.

Based on the latest scientific research, Outsmarting Alzheimer's gives you more than 75 simple, low-cost tips for the most effective brain-boosting activities in six key areas:

S=Social Smarts
M=Meal Smarts
A=Aerobic Smarts
R=Resilience Smarts
T=Train Your Brain Smarts
S=Sleep Smarts

By sharpening your Brain SMARTS, you can boost your mental edge and prevent or slow memory loss, cognitive decline, dementia, and Alzheimer's. In an easy-to-read format, Outsmarting Alzheimer's will help you understand what foods really help or harm your brain, how exercise can literally grow brain cells, and whether you should really be concerned if it takes you a little longer to make a decision these days. Plus, Outsmarting Alzheimer's includes:

  • a bonus 3-week eating and exercise plan to help you put these tips into action
  • almost 40 easy and delicious brain-boosting recipes
  • 50 interactive brain-training games

No matter where you are on the dementia spectrum, Outsmarting Alzheimer's can help you make best choices for your total body health. If you have a family history of Alzheimer's disease, Outsmarting Alzheimer's can help you delay and even stop this debilitating disease years before it develops. If you've noticed a few symptoms, Outsmarting Alzheimer's can help you determine whether they are related to normal aging or whether you should mention them to your doctor. If it turns out that you do have the earliest symptoms of dementia, Outsmarting Alzheimer's offers scores of simple strategies to slow the progression of the disease as much as possible. If you or a family member already have a dementia diagnosis, Outsmarting Alzheimer's offers effective strategies for managing symptoms, improving quality of life, and maintaining your current lifestyle for as long as possible.

Author:

Since 2004, Kenneth S. Kosik, MD, has been the Harriman Professor of Neuroscience Research and Co-Director of the Neuroscience Research Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previously, he was a professor of neurology and neuroscience at Harvard Medical School, and a senior neurologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where he was one of the founding physicians of the Memory Disorders Clinic. His lifelong work is research into the cause and treatment of neurodegeneration, particularly Alzheimer's disease. His study of a group of interrelated families in a rural mountain town in Colombia who suffer from early onset Alzheimer's has been the subject of several documentaries. Dr. Kosik also founded and served as Medical Director of the non-profit Cognitive Fitness and Innovative Therapies (CFIT), a model "brain shop" that helped clients maintain and improve their cognitive function. Dr. Kosik, who received his medical degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and served as chief resident at Tufts New England Medical Center, has been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and on CNN as an expert on brain health. He lives and works in Santa Barbara, California.